Thyme Tea: The Herbal Drink with Diverse Use

Thymus vulgaris, or commonly known as Thyme is one of the ancient herbs famous for its ornamental, medicinal and culinary uses. The oldest use of Thyme was traced to the Egyptian period when they use the herb as an ingredient for embalming dead bodies. Greek people prefer to use thyme as an additive to their hot bath, said the Medical News Today.

Thyme has a variety of uses in terms of helping in treating different kinds of illness and protecting the body from infection (Photo Credits)

Thyme has a variety of uses in terms of helping in treating different kinds of illness and protecting the body from infection (Photo Credits)

A report by A Modern Herbal said that a 1931 study by Maud Grieve reported Romans using thyme in processing cheese and alcoholic drinks. While another study quoted Hippocrates for saying the thyme is one of the culinary herbs they grow and eat in the countryside, and even use it for treating respiratory illnesses back in the days. These reports make thyme tea health benefits really promising for the modern day. Learn how thyme tea bags can slow aging.

Thyme for the Kitchen

Soups and stews will taste even more fabulous with thyme’s essential oils mixed with it. Chefs will testify that thyme brings out the best flavor in meat and poultry meals. Aside from its mouth-watering goodness, eating thyme with your meals can provide mental, physical, and emotional relaxation leaving the whole system energized.

“He who drinks a cup of thyme tea instead of coffee in the morning will soon feel the beneficial effect: enlivened spirits, great comfort in the stomach, no coughing in the morning and an overall well-being,” stated Abbess Hildegard von Bingen in Natural News. Find out how to make thyme tea recipe for upset stomach.

Thyme for the Health: Health Benefits of Drinking Thyme Herbal Tea

Thyme is known for its pleasant taste and smell, and behind that is a substance called thymol which is a potential antioxidant. Thyme tea health benefits have been continuously growing since researchers keep finding new things about thyme. A lot of its flavonoid components like luteolin, naringenin and thymonin have been used in many treatments.

Cough and colds can be very frustrating since no medicine can easily make it go away. But the next time you catch, a cup of thyme tea would be the best beverage to drink. A study from the University of Maryland Medical Center reported in Live Strong says that thyme can aid in treating bronchitis and coughs. The German Commission E already approved the use of thyme for drug preparation. Some drinkers suggest lemon thyme tea for cough and colds since it tastes and works like wonder.

Furthermore, it relieves indigestion, helps kill bacteria that cause acne, and reduces the risk of hypertension or high blood pressure.

Aside from thyme tea, thyme essential oil can be added to your regular bath for soothing and relaxing feel while enjoying the warm water.

Video on How to Make Thyme Tea Using Fresh or Dried Thyme

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Reasons Why Valerian Root Tea is Good for You

The use of valerian root was traced back to as early as thousands of years ago with enough proof till the second century. However, its medicinal way of use have been constantly changing over time, treating one illness to another.

Valerian has been widely growing in Europe, North America, and Asia .It became a popular mild sedative in the ancient times for thousands of years since the Romans, Indians, Greeks and Chinese use it frequently.

Valerian root tea provides ease of insomnia, anxiety, headache, high blood pressure, and depression, which has been proven safe to be taken in appropriate amounts. (Photo Credits)

Valerian root tea provides ease of insomnia, anxiety, headache, high blood pressure, and depression, which has been proven safe to be taken in appropriate amounts. (Photo Credits)

Studies from the University of Maryland Medical Center, as reported by the Live Strong, proved that valerian root is generally safe when taken as directed and in prescribed amounts. But before adding valerian root to your diet, it is much better to consult with a qualified medical practitioner to know if valerian root tea will be good for your health.

Medicinal Use of Valerian Root

One of the earliest use of valerian root is to treat sleeping problems and anxiety. A lot of people had and are still suffering from insomnia – and valerian root has been widely proven effective to treat this illness because it contains a specific chemical that has a sedative effect. However, researchers are still debating as to how the mechanism for sleep aid works. Some experts from the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center say that a chemical compound called valepotriates is responsible for the sedative effect while some theorized that the breakdown of the compound forming byproducts that release the sleepiness effect.

Some people seeking for herbal medication for anxiety are recommended to take valerian root. Studies have shown that some chemicals in plant bind safely to the receptors in the brain resulting in relaxation.

Valerian root tea for sleep and anxiety may work for some people, but these are serious illnesses that require medical consultation first, advised by the MedLine. Read more info on valerian root tea for sleep.

Other Valerian Tea High Health Benefits

Aside from being popular as insomnia and anxiety remedy, it also helps treat indigestion, irritability, hysteria, tension, panic attacks, depression, muscle cramps and reduces high blood pressure. Another popular use is its diuretic property so people who are trying to shred off some calories include it in their diet.

Another medical use is for menstrual symptoms. Women with menstrual cramps, dysmenorrhea and pain are advised to drink a cup or two during their cycle. Because of this, valerian root tea and pregnancy is not a good match since it may induce abortion even though that still needs to be supported by scientific research, as mentioned by the Herbal Teas Online. See more valerian root tea benefits.

Valerian Root Tea Recipe

A simple recipe can be made with a teaspoon full of dried or fresh valerian roots boiled with 170 millimeters of water for 10 minutes. The mixture will be strained to remove roots and addition of milk, lemon, honey or other sweeteners will give a different flavor to the tasty drink. Learn more on how to make a healthy valerian root tea recipe.

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What Can Mugwort Tea Do to Your Body?

(Photo Credits)

Mugwort tea has been widely used in treating a number of illnesses because it contains a lot of chemical components such as essential oils, flavonoids, sesquiterpene, triterpenes, lactone and coumarin derivatives. (Photo Credits)

This traditional Asian medicine has been widely used for more than 3,000 years ago especially in China. It became popular as an ingredient in a process called moxibustion, which is used to treat menstrual cramps and put a fetus in proper position inside the womb.

Ancient medication includes leaves of wormwood or mugwort, are shaped into cones or sticks about the same size and shape as a cigar, which is then burned and pointed into an acupuncture point, and these are just some of the ways on how to make mugwort tea.

It has been used to strengthen and warm a person’s blood and inner energy, and they use it to treat some types of cancers and inflammations. Today, there is still few studies that cover the real health benefits of mugwort tea on patients. They also fail to support the claims that are still being used in modern days.

Mugwort Tea Health Benefits

Women who are experiencing irregularity in their menstrual cycle as advised to drink mugwort tea to stimulate their body. But some women say that it caused them to have delayed menstruation. Ancient practices use the herb to induce abortion making it a harmful drink for pregnant and breastfeeding women.

Herbal practices in Europe and America include mugwort for treating intestinal and stomach issues like gas, diarrhea, and colic. They also give it to patients suffering from nosebleeds, chills, fever, headaches, insomnia and nerve problems, as reported in the Web MD. Some herbalists claim that it possesses an antifungal and antibacterial properties. But these claims remain unproven to-date and not approved by health agencies.

Studies on Mugwort

Most studies on mugwort fail to prove its medical promises, and usually focus on its adverse side effects on the person taking it. It was reported by the Health Line that the American Cancer Society have shown several studies that say mugwort causes allergic reactions resulting in uncontrollable sneezing and other sinus-related symptoms. Some people reported having suffered skin rashes, or contact dermatitis.

Ways on Taking Mugwort

The Herbal Supplement Resource said that there is still no proven safe or effective dosage of mugwort to be taken for different kind of illnesses. The best way to use it is through the traditional mugwort tea. The common healthy mugwort tea recipe recommends up to two cups for every six days blended with fresh leaves that are boiled for 5 to 10 minutes.

But a readily available capsule sold as a supplement is advised by the manufacturer to be taken twice daily, or it is still best to consult a physician prior to taking the supplement. Find out where to buy mugwort tea.

Mugwort Tea: What Bitter Plants Can Do for your Health

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Caption: Mugwort tea has been widely used in treating a number of illnesses because it contains a lot of chemical components such as essential oils, flavonoids, sesquiterpene, triterpenes, lactone and coumarin derivatives.

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